Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of wont
Meaning of wont by Wiktionary Dictionary

wont


    Pronunciation

    • enPR: wŏnt or wōnt, IPA: /wɒnt/ or /wəʊnt/, X-SAMPA: /wQnt/ or /w@Unt/
    • Rhymes: -əʊnt

    Etymology 1

    Origin uncertain: apparently a conflation of wone and wont ( participle adjective, below ) .

    Noun

    wont ( usually uncountable; plural: wonts )

    1. One’s habitual way of doing things, practice, custom .
      He awoke at the crack of dawn, as was his wont .

    Etymology 2

    Old English ġewunod, past participle of ġewunian .

    Adjective

    wont ( not comparable )

    1. ( archaic ) Accustomed or used ( to or with a thing ).
    2. ( designating habitual behaviour ) Accustomed, apt ( to doing something ) .
      He is wont to complain loudly about his job .
      Like a 60-yard Percy Harvin touchdown run or a Joe Haden interception return, Urban Meyer’s jaw-dropping resignation Saturday was, as he’s wont to say, “a game-changer.” — Sunday December 27, 2009, Stewart Mandel, INSIDE COLLEGE FOOTBALL, Meyer’s shocking resignation rocks college coaching landscape
    See also

    Verb

    wont ( third-person singular simple present wonts present participle wonting, simple past and past participle wonted )

    1. ( transitive, archaic ) To make ( someone ) used to; to accustom .
    2. ( intransitive, archaic ) To be accustomed.

    Anagrams


    wo'n't

    By Wiktionary ( 2010/11/23 00:26 UTC Version )

    Etymology 1

    Abbreviation of woll + not

    短縮形

    wo'n't

    1. ( archaic ) Alternative spelling of won't.

    Etymology 2

    Abbreviation of would + not

    短縮形

    wo'n't

    1. ( archaic ) Alternative spelling of wouldn't .

    Anagrams


    won't

    By Wiktionary ( 2011/10/07 19:58 UTC Version )

    Alternative forms

    Etymology

    Abbreviation of wollnot or woll + not, negations of archaic form of will .

    Pronunciation

    • ( RP ) enPR: wōnt, IPA: /wəʊnt/, SAMPA: /w@Unt/
    • ( GenAm ) enPR: wōnt, IPA: /woʊnt/, SAMPA: /woUnt/

    短縮形

    won't

    1. will not; used to indicate a future non-occurring action .
      Sam won't be doing any work this afternoon .

    Synonyms

    • ( will not ): ( archaic ) willn't, wo'n't, wonnot

    See also

    • Appendix:English tag questions

    Statistics

    Anagrams



Explanation of wont by Wordnet Dictionary

wont


    Noun
    1. an established custom



    Definition of wont by GCIDE Dictionary

    wont


    1. Wont a. [For woned, p. p. of won, wone, to dwell, AS. wunian; akin to D. wonen, OS. wunn, OHG, wonn, G. wohnen, and AS. wund, gewuna, custom, habit; orig. probably, to take pleasure; cf. Icel. una to dwell, to enjoy, Goth. wunan to rejoice ( in unwunands sad ); and akin to Skr. van to like, to wish. Cf. Wean, Win.] Using or doing customarily; accustomed; habituated; used. “As he was wont to go.” Chaucer.

      If the ox were wont to push with his horn. Ex. xxi. 29.

    2. Wont, n. Custom; habit; use; usage.

      They are . . . to be called out to their military motions, under sky or covert, according to the season, as was the Roman wont. Milton.

      From childly wont and ancient use. Cowper.

    3. Wont, v. i. [imp. Wont, p. p. Wont, or Wonted; p. pr. & vb. n. Wonting.] To be accustomed or habituated; to be used.

      A yearly solemn feast she wont to make. Spenser.

    4. Wont, v. i. [imp. Wont, p. p. Wont, or Wonted; p. pr. & vb. n. Wonting.] To be accustomed or habituated; to be used.

      A yearly solemn feast she wont to make. Spenser.

    5. Wont, v. i. [imp. Wont, p. p. Wont, or Wonted; p. pr. & vb. n. Wonting.] To be accustomed or habituated; to be used.

      A yearly solemn feast she wont to make. Spenser.

    6. Wont, v. t. To accustom; -- used reflexively.